Want to eggs of spodoptera frugiperda

I am from India, working on spodoptera frugiperda for doctoratal study, i want to eggs of spodoptera frugiperda.

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Spodoptera frugiperda egg mass scale thickness modulates Trichogramma parasitoid performance

The fall armyworm (FAW) Spodoptera frugiperda (Smith) is a major agricultural pest in Americas, Africa and Asia. Egg masses are covered with scale layers and the various scale layer thicknesses of these masses can affect parasitoids efficiency. The present study aimed to determine dynamics of the scale thickness on egg masses and its effect on Trichogramma parasitoid performance. The scale thickness ranged from 0μm to 400 μm and can be graded in three levels. Level I was the naked egg masses without or covered with a thin scale, and the thickness was below 80 μm. Level II was medium covered, with scales where 20%–80% eggs could be seen; the thickness was between 80 μm to 180 μm. Level III was fully-covered with scales and the thickness was above 180 μm (up to 400 μm). The egg mass scale thickness decreased with increasing age of egg laying FAW females; the proportion at level I increased during female aging, while proportion of levels II and III decreased during oviposition period. During FAW female lifetime, the level I showed the highest proportion (51.9%) while the level III showed the lowest (9.9%). The parasitism rate of FAW eggs by Trichogramma dendrolimi varied according to scale thickness, with higher parasitism on eggs and egg masses at level I (31.6%, 78.3%, respectively) and lowest parasitism on level III (eggs: 1.9%; egg masses: 23.1%). We documented factors modulating parasitism effectiveness on FAW and we suggested that timely parasitoid releases targeting egg masses at Level I scale thickness could enable maximizing biocontrol service provided by Trichogramma on FAW.

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Reproductive potential of fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) and effects of feeding on diverse maize genotypes under artificial infestation

Fall armyworm (FAW) Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) has become a major threat to maize production in Africa. In this study, six maize genotypes were assessed for their resistance to FAW under artificial infestation in both laboratory and net house conditions. These included two FAW-tolerant hybrids (CKHFAW180294 and CKH191221), two commercial hybrids (WE2115 and CKH10717), and two open-pollinated varieties (ZM523 and KDV4). Larval development time and reproductive potential were assessed on maize leaves in the laboratory and a life table for FAW was constructed. The maize genotypes were also artificially infested with three FAW neonates at two phenological stages (V5 and V7) and reproductive stage (R1) in the net house. Leaf and ear damage scores were recorded on a scale of 1–9. Larval development time varied significantly between maize genotypes with the highest on CKH191221 (16.4 days) and the lowest on KDV4 (13.7 days). The intrinsic rate of natural increase for life tables varied from 0.24 on CKH191221 to 0.41 on KDV4. Mean generation time of FAW ranged from 17.6 to 22.8 days on KDV4 and CKH191221, respectively. Foliar damage was the lowest on CKH191221, and the highest on KDV4 at V7 infestation stage in week 1. CKH191221 had the lowest ear damage score, whereas ZM523 had the highest scores at V5 infestation stage. The highest and lowest yield reductions were observed on ZM523 (64%) at V7 infestation stage and CKHFAW180294 (6%) at R1 infestation stage, respectively. The results indicated the potential for developing tropical mid-altitude maize germplasm with native genetic resistance to FAW.

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HALOPHILA STIPULACEA (HYDROCHARITACEAE) EN LA LAGUNA DE YAPASCUA, PARQUE NACIONAL SAN ESTEBAN, CARABOBO, VENEZUELA Halophila stipulacea (Hydrocharitaceae) in Laguna de Yapascua, San Esteban National Park, Carabobo, Venezuela

ABSTRACT
The species Halophila stipulacea, considered invasive on the coasts of the
Caribbean, was reported for the first time in Venezuela in 2014, in Vargas state.
In this study, the distribution of this species in the country is extended to the coast of Carabobo state. Sampling was conducted in a seagrass bed in Laguna Yapascua
(San Esteban National Park). The vegetation cover and biomass were estimated,
following the CARICOMP protocol. The seagrass H. stipulacea was distributed to
the deep and inner zone of the lagoon, with an average biomass of 40,62 ±
28,43g/m2
and coverage between 40-100%. These results show the expansion of
this species towards the western coast of Venezuela, being necessary to evaluate
the consequences on other species of seagrass and their associated community.
Key words: Caribbean, invasive species, Halophila stipulacea, seagrass,
Venezuela, Yapascua

RESUMEN
La especie Halophila stipulacea, considerada invasora en las costas del
Caribe, fue reportada por primera vez en Venezuela en el año 2014, en el estado
Vargas. En este estudio, se amplía la distribución de esta especie en el país hasta
la costa del estado Carabobo. Los muestreos se realizaron en una pradera de
fanerógamas en la Laguna Yapascua (Parque Nacional San Esteban). Se estimó la
cobertura y la biomasa de la vegetación, siguiendo el protocolo CARICOMP. La
especie H. stipulacea se distribuyó hacia la zona más profunda e interna de la
laguna, con una biomasa promedio de 40,62 ± 28,43g/m2
y coberturas entre 40-
100%. Estos resultados muestran la expansión de esta especie hacia la costa
occidental venezolana, siendo necesario evaluar las consecuencias sobre otras
especies de fanerógamas y las comunidades asociadas.
Palabras clave: Caribe, especie invasora, fanerógamas, Halophila stipulacea,
Venezuela, Yapascua

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Monocot diet sources drive diversity of gut bacterial communities in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae

 

 

Abstract

Microbiome research is currently gaining tremendous interest on the impact of diets and environment to influence life traits of several hosts. Full understanding of the insect ecology and characterization of gut microbial community including their natural enemies is vital for development of novel insect pest management strategies. This study examined the gut bacterial communities of Fall armyworm (FAW) Spodoptera frugiperda reared in the laboratory with three monocot plant diets (Sugarcane [M1], maize [M2] and onion [M3]) using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The study revealed variations in the structure and community of the gut bacterial biota of FAW larvae reared with three monocot plants. Diet sources greatly altered the structure of the gut bacterial community.

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The distribution of covert microbial natural enemies of a globally invasive crop pest, fall armyworm, in Africa: Enemy release and spillover events

Pleased to share a link to A research paper on the distribution of covert microbial natural enemies of fall armyworm publish in the Journal of Animal Ecology, British Ecological Society. These work was done partly in Africa (Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Sudan abd and Zambia) and Uk. By several Authors, led by Amy J. Withers.... And myself as coauthor. 

https://besjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/share/HHU9AM482QAAFHCP3AM2?target=10.1111/1365-2656.13760

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A nonlinear model for stage-structured population dynamics with nonlocal density-dependent regulation: An application to the fall armyworm moth

The assessment and the management of the risks linked to insect pests can be supported by the use of physiologically-based demographic models. These models are useful in population ecology to simulate the dynamics of stage-structured populations, by means of functions (e.g., development, mortality and fecundity rate functions) realistically representing the nonlinear individuals physiological responses to environmental forcing variables. Since density-dependent responses are important regulating factors in population dynamics, we propose a nonlinear physiologically-based Kolmogorov model describing the dynamics of a stage-structured population in which a time-dependent mortality rate is coupled with a nonlocal density-dependent term. We prove existence and uniqueness of the solution for this resulting highly nonlinear partial differential equation. Then, the equation is discretized by finite volumes in space and semi-implicit backward Euler scheme in time. The model is applied for simulating the population dynamics of the fall armyworm moth (Spodoptera frugiperda), a highly invasive pest threatening agriculture worldwide.

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Assessing the risk of establishment and transient populations of Spodoptera frugiperda in Europe

The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is an invasive pest threatening crop production and food security worldwide. High concerns are linked to the potential establishment of the species in Europe. The high migratory capacity of S. frugiperda causes concerns about the potential impacts of transient populations invading new areas from suitable hotspots. In the present work, we developed and used a physiologically-based demographic model to quantitatively assess the risks of S. frugiperda in Europe. The risks were assessed considering a best-, a median-, and a worst-case scenario. The Mediterranean coastal areas of Southern Europe resulted particularly suitable for the establishment of the species, with suitable areas reaching even higher latitudes, in the worst-case scenario. In Europe, up to four generations per year were predicted. The predicted yearly average number of moths per trap per week (± standard deviation) was 5 (± 4), 17 (± 5), and 139 (± 22) in the best, median-, and worst-case assessment scenarios, respectively. Model results showed that Southern and Central Europe up to the 48th parallel north might be exposed to the risk of transient populations. Depending on the latitude and on the period of arrival of the propagule, 1–2 transient generations per year might be expected. The model can be used to define strategies for reducing the risks of establishment of the pest at the country level. Predictions on the dynamics and phenology of the pest can also be used to support its management at the local level.

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OCCURRENCE OF FALL ARMY WORM SPODOPTERA FRUGIPERDA (J E SMITH) IN ASSAM

The fall army worm (FAW) has spread to locations at 1222 msl in the northeast region of India. In Assam, its incidence was first noticed on the two banks of the Brahmaputra. In Biswanath district, infestation on maize was observed to be of 15.2-64.3% at farmers' field and 2.15% in Biswanath College of Agriculture campus of the Assam Agricultural University. This variation might be attributed to the rich avian diversity in the college campus. No larval parasite was observed in the field collected larvae. A large section of farmers observed high pest incidence in maize as compared to previous years.

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HOW PUSH-PULL WORKS AGAINST Fall Armyworm?

We wonder that, 3 years ago. Last week the paper with the findings went out to the public. We are glad to publish our results in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, explaining how the plant volatiles (Chemical Ecology) of companion crops mitigates Spodoptera frugiperda damage in maize crops. A paper worth to be read in Africa and all over the world, with implications for reduction of pesticides use and increase of Agroecological practices. A great collaboration between ICIPE and the University of Keele, funded by BBSRC of UK. Please find it here:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fevo.2022.883020/full

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